Flies in the garden

Rhingia campestris (c) Duncan Hutt

Hoverfly feeds on nectar (c) Duncan Hutt

A house fly (c) Duncan Hutt

Flies don’t seem to have done that well so far this year and yet, in the last week or two, they do seem to have begun to pick up to more normal summer levels.  This must be a welcome turn of events for the swallows, swifts and martins as well as a plethora of other birds for which flies make up a significant part of their diet.  The early evening sunshine brought out a few flies to feed on the nectar of flowers or simply to bask in the rare sunshine.  There are plenty of varieties out there making identification tricky, an expert probably has to differentiate through a microscope on many occasions so, for now at least, most will remain unnamed as far as we are concerned.  One striking exception was the hoverfly Rhingia campestris.  The book says of this species that it is easily identified by its snout, and sure enough this is its most striking feature.  The other hoverfly and house fly will remain partially anonymous!

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About thehutts

The Hutt Family from Northumberland
This entry was posted in Invertebrates, Northumberland and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Flies in the garden

  1. vivinfrance says:

    I clicked ‘like’ because of the fabulous quality of the photographs, not because I like flies, which have been increasingly busy here since the warm week we had, mostly landing on Jock’s head or my legs. Some of them sting? bite? Whatever it is, it hurts and lasts for days. I’m glad for the swallow family, though.

  2. Pingback: Where are the hoverflies? | Northumberland and Beyond

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