Trips out into the Maasai Mara: part 2 the grazing animals

Wildebeest and zebra (c) Fraser Hutt

Wildebeest and zebra (c) Fraser Hutt

The life of the cats in the Mara is intimately linked to many of the grazing animals that wander around this large game reserve.  Thomson’s gazelle and impala were the first to be spotted as we entered from the Talek gate but soon we were also coming across the larger topi.

Elephants (c) Duncan Hutt

Elephants (c) Duncan Hutt

As with the lions, we are all so familiar with elephants that it’s hard to realise that these were wild and in their natural habitat.  The herd munched away apparently oblivious of the vehicles that were passing by, or perhaps very well aware of the vehicles but disdainful of their presence.  We came across two groups of these huge mammals the second were around a dead herd member, apparently the result of natural causes.  The herd was still not ready to move on from their dead companion six days after the death.

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Elsewhere zebra and wildebeest roamed in mixed herds, the distant plain speckled with them.  Some of the animals appeared restless, perhaps ready to migrate to follow the overdue rains.  Buffalo too were to be seen in large herds, from young calves looking so similar to a domestic cow up to huge males with their large yoke shaped horns over their head.

Giraffes wandered casually around nibbling on their topiaried trees that were scattered across the plains and occasionally we glimpsed an eland or a hartebeest.

Hartebeest on the horizon (c) Duncan Hutt

Hartebeest on the horizon (c) Duncan Hutt

Hippopotamuses lounge in the Talek River (c) Duncan Hutt

Hippopotamuses lounge in the Talek River
(c) Duncan Hutt

Down by the river we were able to watch groups of hippopotamuses lounging in the water.  They appeared so content with what looked like large beaming smiles on their faces.  It’s so easy to anthropomorphise and so hard to remember that these grumpy creatures are the cause of so many deaths in Africa.

Dotted over the Maasai Mara were other creatures such as warthog, sometimes alone, sometimes with a little crowd of adolescent warthogs dashing around.   Hyenas hung around the lions or occasionally wandered past alone, one with a radio collar as part of a study on their behaviour.

An evening shower creates a rainbow (c) Duncan Hutt

An evening shower creates a rainbow (c) Duncan Hutt

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About thehutts

The Hutt Family from Northumberland
This entry was posted in Kenya, Mammals and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Trips out into the Maasai Mara: part 2 the grazing animals

  1. Pingback: Mother Love | Vivinfrance's Blog

  2. This is a post full of wonders. I have linked my blog to yours tonight, as my poem uses one of Fraser’s lion pictures: http://vivinfrance.wordpress.com/2013/11/26/mother-love/

  3. Kay Haw says:

    Wow such an amazing place, definitely on my must visit list! Thanks for the stunning images 🙂

  4. restlessjo says:

    Sounds like you had an amazing time! 🙂
    Best wishes.

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